See the Emergency in Cholesterol

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C): one of the most critical factors in reducing CV risk

  • Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood that helps the body to generate new cell walls, hormones, and bile acids.4
  • Too much cholesterol can build up within the arteries (plaque formation), making them too narrow and thus reducing blood flow. The plaque can eventually harden, and may rupture to form blood clots which can obstruct the flow of blood.5,6
  • Cholesterol includes good and bad cholesterol, apart from other components: High-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good” cholesterol.4 Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad” cholesterol.4
NORMAL ARTERY WITH NORMAL BLOODFLOW
NORMAL ARTERY
WITH NORMAL BLOODFLOW
PLAQUE FORMATION WITH CHOLESTEROL DEPOSIT AND REDUCED BLOODFLOW
PLAQUE FORMATION WITH
CHOLESTEROL DEPOSIT AND REDUCED BLOODFLOW
RUPTURED PLAQUE WITH OBSTRUCTED BLOODFLOW5,6
RUPTURED PLAQUE
WITH OBSTRUCTED BLOODFLOW5,6
  • Uncontrolled or continuous high LDL-C is a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). High LDL-C could lead to a heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke.1,3,4
  • While CVD risk factors such as a family history of disease or age cannot be changed, high LDL-C is one of the most important and impactful modifiable risk factors.3
  • The growing unmet needs in treating hyperlipidemic patients include the reduction of the patients' risks for CVD and the consequent reduction of the occurrence of CV events. This confirms the need to intensify lipid-modifying management.7
  • Reducing LDL-C is particularly critical in patients who have had multiple events or a recent cardiovascular event.2
  • The introduction of statins resulted in significant progress in cardiovascular care. However, if cholesterol levels are high despite taking high-intensity statins or other traditional lipid-lowering therapies, many patients could be at high risk for another heart attack or stroke.8,9
  • Statins alone may not be enough for everyone.8

Every 39 mg/dL (1mmol/L) reduction in LDL-C9

22% risk reduction in major CV event9

On December 6th, the Dubai Health Authority, Emirates Cardiac Society, World Heart Federation united with Amgen to raise awareness on cholesterol and other risk factors that increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, while encouraging people to eat healthy and exercise regularly. The public was invited to receive free cholesterol screenings onsite and view a video broadcast on the world’s tallest tower – Burj Khalifa. More than 1500 people took part in the free cholesterol screening.

IT’S TIME TO TAKE CONTROL

Know how controlling your cholesterol reduces your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Download the brochure for more information.

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Know how you can care for your loved one after a heart attack or stroke. Download the brochure for more information.

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Know how you can help your patients lower their LDL-C. Download the brochure for more information.

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Know how you can help your patients side-by-side with your doctor. Download the brochure for more information.

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References:

1. World Health Organization. Prevention of Recurrences of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke Study The PREMISE programme: country projects. Available at: http://www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/priorities/secondary_prevention/country/en/index1.html. Last accessed June 2018. 2. Bhatt DL, Eagle KA, Ohman EM, et al. Comparative determinants of 4-year cardiovascular event rates in stable outpatientsat risk of or with atherothrombosis. JAMA.2010;304:1350-1357. 3. Yusuf S, Hawken S, Ôunpuu S, et al. Effect of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study. Lancet. 2004;364:937-952. 4. Goldstein JL, Brown MS. The LDL Receptor. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2009;29(4);431–438. 5. Hansson GK, Inflammation, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease. N Engl J Med. 2005;352(16);1685-1695. 6. Glagov S, Weisenberg E, Zarins CK, Stankunavicius R, Kolettis GJ. Compensatory enlargement of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries. N Engl J Med. 1987;316(22);1371-1375. 7. Waters DD, Brotons C, Chiang CW, et al; Lipid Treatment Assessment Project 2 Investigators. Lipid treatment assessment project 2: a multinational survey to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals. Circulation. 2009;120(1);28-34. 8. Fox K, Kostev K, Vultee C, et al. Lack of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal attainment among high-risk patients using high or moderate intensity statin therapy in Germany. Eur Heart J. 38. 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx502.P2320. 9. Sampson UK, Fazio S, Linton MF. Residual cardiovascular risk despite optimal LDL cholesterol reduction with statins: the evidence, etiology, and therapeutic challenges. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2012;14(1);1-10. 10. Gitt A, Lautsch D, Ferrieres J, et al. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in a global cohort of 57,885 statin-treated patients. Atherosclerosis. 2016;255;200-209. 11. Boekholdt SM, Hovingh GK, Mora S, et al. Very low levels of atherogenic lipoproteins and the risk for cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis of statin trials. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;64(5);485-494. 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.02.615.